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What Most Pet Owners Never Think About: Fall Safety Tips for your Pets

on October 7, 2016
Posted in Grooming

Fall Safety Tips for your Pets when it comes to FLEA protection and other outside dangers.

Fall is a beautiful time of year but it can actually be dangerous for your pet! When the weather gets colder, the fleas are also looking to attach to furry hosts such as your pets. This is the time to take preventative measures.

Here are some tips to keep your pet safe at this time of the year:

  1. Even if you don’t use rodenticide in order to protect your precious pet, your neighbours may. The use of rat and mouse poison increases in the fall. Be sure your pet is not exposed to these deadly poisons. Keep them out of paws reach! Be cautious about where your pets spend your time, because if something happens, you may not be able to trace back to the root cause of toxins, or even allergens.
  2. Your child’s back pack or lunch box may be of interest to your pet. Glue sticks, pencils and magic markers can cause GI upset in your pet if he or she ingests them. Old sandwiches hold great fascination for curious pets who will eat anything. Don’t leave those things around for your pets to muck into!
  3. The fall brings an increase in mushrooms and toadstools. 99% of all mushrooms are non toxic but that 1% that is toxic is very toxic. It is almost impossible to tell a non toxic mushroom from a toxic mushroom so if your pet eats a mushroom be sure to take him or her to the emergency room immediately.
  4. If you have outdoor pets, now is the time to insure they will have fresh, clean unfrozen water for the winter. Make sure all shelters for horses or dogs are clean and warm enough for the kind of winter you get.
  5. Pay attention to engine coolants at this time of year. Many people change their antifreeze and even a small amount of this substance can be toxic to pets. Use pet friendly antifreeze and watch out for spills. If your pet comes in contact with this, take him or her to the closest veterinarian or emergency hospital as antifreeze is highly toxic.

With a few simple precautions, fall can be a great time for you and your pet. If you are concerned about FLEAS, here is our latest blog on everything you need to know to protect your pet from fleas!


  • If you have children in your household: remember “back to school” transitions may cause some adjustment not only for your kids, but your pets as well. Your pets may have become accustomed to having constant playmates and when the kids are back at school, the fur kids are often bored. Here are a few tips to help with the transition:
  • Make sure your child’s daily routine includes his or her pet..Your pet still needs to be fed and walked and these are great activities the pets and kids can do together. Make sure to factor in some extra one on one time with the pets for play and exercise. Plan fun activities that your child can do with the pet on the weekends. Apple picking is a great idea. Most orchards are fine with leashed dogs. Trips to the park can be great for the entire family.
  • If your pet is left alone a lot now that everyone is back at school, insure he or she has lots of toys and food puzzles. Now might be a good time to get some new toys for the pets to enjoy. Kongs filled with high value treats or interactive treat dispensing toys may prevent destructive behaviours.
  • Consider enrolling in a dog class in which your child can participate as the trainer or handler. This is good for both of them.
  • Spend extra time grooming your pet. Most pets love the attention of being brushed and with fall coming it is shedding time. Your pet will get lots of love and your house will be cleaner!
  • A few safety tips for back to school—Back to school shopping frequently includes glue sticks, pencils and magic markers.  These items can cause GI upset in your pet if he or she ingests them. Be sure to keep them out of paws reach.

If you consider your pet as well as your child the back to school transition can be easy and smooth for the pet at least! Remember how you do something, is how you do everything, so if you are attentive with your pet now, you are cultivating a healthy lifetime for your four-legged family member. (and they are always grateful for that!)


The most common question our team of Professionals & Veterinarians are being asked today is this:

“What is one product that you recommend to ensure the long-term health of my pet for disease prevention, which is also easy for me to incorporate into our daily lives?” 

Here is that product we all agree is a great supplement which actually boosts immunity of your pets, literally it is food for your pet’s immune system. It is easy enough to mix into their food and it provides optimal value, and it lasts a long time, especially for cats!

SPARK is a comprehensive supplement designed to supply more nutrition that canines and felines can’t get from their diet. A leading naturopathic veterinarian developed SPARK to be a complete, all in one delivery system of 43 natural ingredients, all researched and synergistically combined for their ability to maintain excellent health!

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Main components of SPARK:

Non-synthetic sources of vitamins and minerals Probiotics & prebiotics + enzymes for healthy digestion
Fiber Vitamin D
Fruit & vegetable “superfoods” Sea Vegetables
Antioxidants Amino Acids

Many of the ingredients are termed “superfoods” because they are rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. These ingredients are easy to absorb and assimilate and they maintain good health right down to the cellular level.

Unfortunately, many pet foods are highly processed and lack the vital nutrients that pets need to thrive. There is a big difference between surviving and thriving. SPARK was developed to give pets the best possible nutrition, so you never have to wonder if they are getting everything they need. Simply sprinkle it on their food. Most pets not only love the taste, they crave it. Take the 60 day challenge and see how your pet enjoys SPARK.

SPARK is gluten free. To order SPARK click here!

Read also: Canine Pancreatitis: why high amounts of fat in your dog’s diet is unhealthy

Our Expert

Dr. Janice Huntingford
Janice Huntingford, DVM, has been in veterinary practice for over 30 years and has founded two veterinary clinics since receiving her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph. She has studied extensively in both conventional and holistic modalities. Ask Dr. Jan

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