image

Dreaded Season for FLEAS? Natural Bug Repellent Spray Works Fast!

on October 6, 2016
Posted in Pet Allergies

The dreaded season for FLEAS is here.

Fall is the dreaded time for FLEAS. At this time of the year, fleas are trying to attach themselves to our pets in an attempt to escape the cold, in most environments with cooling temperatures. Fall and Spring are the common times for flea infestations, and it works best to prepare in advance, before your pet shows obvious signs!

The common flea, Ctenocephalis felis, is well known to most dog and cat owners. Fleas are tiny primitive parasites that feed on the blood of dogs and cats and humans in some cases. Fleas live on pets and in the environment. Fleas have a 4 stage life cycle: egg, larva, pupa and adult.

Research shows that if you have a flea problem in your house, then you can count that  5% are  actually adult fleas. Most of the fleas exist as pupae ( 10%), larva (35%) and eggs (50%). Since a single female flea can produce 2000 offspring in 6 weeks, it is important to focus on getting rid of the other stages. The real problem is in the pupa stage; it is resistant to just about everything, so that even when you kill all the adults, eggs and larvae with conventional insecticides and growth regulators, you will have fleas again in about two weeks when the pupae hatch.

So how do you win the war on fleas?

  • Start with a good diet for your pet. If your pet is on a good high quality homemade or premium diet then they will not taste or smell as good to the fleas. They have increased natural resistance. Garlic and brewer’s yeast have been used as supplements to help control fleas but if your pet is on a good basic diet these may not be needed. You need to watch the amount of garlic you use in your pets– do NOT use a garlic supplement in cats. Limit the amount given to dogs–1/4 clove for small dogs up to 1 clove for large breed dogs. Brewer’s yeast can actually be an allergen for dogs so it is not one of my favourites either.
  • Bathe your pet weekly and use a flea comb to comb out fleas. You can use herbal flea shampoos but in reality any glycerine shampoo with kill the fleas and is very gentle. It can even be used in young puppies and kittens.
  • Perhaps the easiest way to prevent fleas and treat the symptoms is Pet Wellbeing’s Pooch Protect Bug Repellent Spray which is safe, effective and inexpensive. This product is holistic, made out of 4 natural ingredients but please avoid making a similar formulation at home! We advice to avoid using essential oils unless you use a product endorsed by and recommended by your veterinarian. Essential oils from conventional sources can be toxic to cats.

Pooch Protect Repellent Spray is formulated to be safe for both cats and dogs, and it’s 100% Chemical-Free, with effective protection from fleas, ticks, mosquitoes and flies! 

Note from Dr. Janice, Pet Wellbeing Advisor:

Topical conventional spot on insecticides can be effective if you are having a severe problem but watch what you use. I do NOT recommend any over the counter flea spot ons that you buy at the pet store or big box stores. They are highly TOXIC and I have seen many animal get sick from these even at the proper dosage. Instead get one from your veterinarian. There are other safe, non toxic medications that are synthetic flea hormones and do not effect mammals.

For caring owners who want the best for their pet… without the debilitating side effects and expensive fees of prescribed medicines – “Pooch Protect Spray” is only $16.99


Free Ebook from Pet Wellbeing

If your pet is struggling with SKIN ALLERGIES and other common pet allergies –  you will benefit from our Complete Guide to Pet Allergies FREE Ebook offering Natural Treatment & Prevention, download your copy for free below: 

ebook

Read also: Pet Immunology 101: Why pH Balance is vital for Pet’s Wellbeing

Our Expert

Dr. Janice Huntingford
Janice Huntingford, DVM, has been in veterinary practice for over 30 years and has founded two veterinary clinics since receiving her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph. She has studied extensively in both conventional and holistic modalities. Ask Dr. Jan

Related Posts