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Spring Pet Detox

on May 17, 2016
Posted in Preventative Care

Spring Detoxification for pets

Spring is a great time to clean things out—not only our houses but our bodies as well and this includes our pets.  Our environment is toxic and our pets are exposed to toxins in the environment even more than we are.  Most toxins are produced in the body every day as a result of digestion.   Our pets were designed to eat real food.  Our fast paced, convenience society has affected the way we eat and the way we feed our pets. Our pets need greens in their diets and living food and commercial dog food is devoid of these. Dry food is also a stress on the kidneys. Detoxification can be a way to reduce chronic disease and slow aging.

What are signs that my pet needs a detox?

  • Waxy ears
  • Dental tartar
  • Musty or greasy odour
  • Arthritis
  • Weight gain

What are the major factors that cause toxic build up?

  • Diet—dry commercial low quality
  • Excess vaccines or medications
  • Pesticides
  • Insecticides
  • Pollution

How do I do a detox?

  1. Start with a 12-hour water fast only
  2. Feed a natural real grain free diet for at least one week.
  3. Use supplements like fish oil, probiotics and digestive enzymes ( add the links here or below—your choice)
  4. Add a high-quality vitamin-mineral supplement (such as SPARK)
  5. Use detoxifying herbs such as Life Gold
  6. Limit exposure to vaccines and other drugs
  7. Use natural treatments for arthritis—try chiropractic, acupuncture, and herbals ( such as Agile Joints)

Most naturopaths will recommend 2 detoxification cycles per year with one being done in the spring and the other in the fall. The rest of the year maintaining a healthy body can be done with maintaining a proper diet, supplements and limiting toxin exposure.

 

Read also: Sunburn…..Animals get burned too!!

Our Expert

Dr. Janice Huntingford
Janice Huntingford, DVM, has been in veterinary practice for over 30 years and has founded two veterinary clinics since receiving her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph. She has studied extensively in both conventional and holistic modalities. Ask Dr. Jan

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